How to Wash a Stubborn Dog

Some dogs hate when it's time for a bath. A pooch that has distaste for water will fight and squirm and pull until the hose is turned off. It is more common for older dogs to have a problem with baths than puppies. If an owner is able to train a dog to behave during a bath when they're younger, there is a much better chance that they will be calmer around water.

If your dog hasn't been acclimated to baths, there is still some hope. In spite of old sayings, it is possible to "teach an old dog new tricks." If you have a bit of patience and a pair of shorts you don't mind getting wet, there is likelihood that your dog can be a better-behaved hound when the shampoo comes out.

How Often Does My Dog Need Washing?
Washing your dog is personal preference. There are some pooches that are "inside dogs" and take care of their own hygiene very well. These pups can go all year without a single bath and houseguests would never notice.

However, there are other dogs who have oily coats or are prone to rolling in the dirt that need to be washed on a weekly basis. Unless your dog has special skin conditions or your veterinarian recommends otherwise, you can wash your doggie whenever you like, though once every week or two is generally enough.

Why Does My Dog Hate Baths?
According to DogCare.com, there are many reasons that your dog may hate getting a bath. The key to making your pooch tolerant about getting wet is keeping them comfortable during a bath. If you speak to them in a soothing voice, hand them treats or their favorite toy; you can associate baths with a good time.

If your dog came from a Humane Society or the "pound" there is the chance that they were not given the chance to become acclimated to getting baths and their first experiences may have been unpleasant. A dog that has gotten cold, rushed showers will be uneasy about water anytime they hear the faucet turned on.

Making Bath Time Easier

There are a few things pet owners can do to make bath time easier on their dogs and as well as themselves. Here are some tools you can use when your furry best friend starts stinking:

  • Preparation: If you wash your dog in the bath-try to already have the bath filled up halfway before you bring them into the bathroom. You'll save time and the running faucet won't spook your pooch. Always try to use luke-warm water.
  • Booster Baths: Whether you wash your dog inside or outside, a Booster Bath can be just the thing to make bath time a breeze. The all-in-one dog washing station is able to use both of your hands while your dog is safely contained in the bath. It is also a "back saver" because you can raise the bath without having to bend down to wash your pooch.
  • Positive Commands: A calm voice and relaxed vibe will help your pet during bath time. A treat before and after the bath can work wonders for troublesome pets.
Wherever you choose to wash your pooch, always remember to use special shampoos and conditioners that are formulated just-for-dogs. Shampoo for humans may smell good, but they can seriously irritate your pooch's skin. For a full list of different doggy shampoos, visit Pet Street Mall to see a variety of different types of soaps and conditioners.
By Sean Bowes
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